Okay. A little confession here: this is the first time I've seen Finding Nemo. Cue the abuse: 'WHAT?/You call yourself a film critic?/You claim to be the king of the jungle?' I'll answer those one by one: 'I know!/I know!/Not for some time now.' In short, Finding Nemo is class.
ou probably all know the story by now but just in case (there has to be others out there who are Nemo newbies too). here's a roundup of events: Nemo (Gould) is a clownfish with a 'gimpy' fin and an overprotective dad in Marlin (Brooks). To defiantly prove to dad that he can do stuff like other fish, Nemo leaves the safe confines of the coral and swims out to bravely touch the underside of a boat floating in open water. However, dad's worst fears are realised when Nemo is snatched up by a diver and taken topside where the boat roars off. Dad sets out to track down his only son.


o Cars and Cars 2 are still the real chink in Pixar's armour as Finding Nemo, as you already know, is one of the strongest in their canon. Awash in stunningly beautiful colours that demand to be marvelled at (you go ahead and marvel at us, they say), the 3D, although not as impressive as you'd expect, heightens the sheen. Stanton and Unkrich create the sense of hopelessness in Marlin's quest, presenting the ocean as a vast world with danger around every coral (see what I did there?).
hope Albert Brooks got kudos first time out as he's perfect as the worried dad. It might be his film but it's dotted with other delightful characters too, like Degeneres's forgetful Dory and Gill, voiced by Dafoe who really should lend his voice to more animation. Its message is different to what Disney usually offer up (be yourself and everything will be okay), Nemo seems to be saying 'obey your parents and bad things won't happen'. But it also warns the parents to let go. It's different and refreshing.
o if you, ahem, haven't seen it yet, or have kids now and want to see it with them, the 3D re-release is the perfect excuse.
nbsp;
nbsp;